Fresh snow

5th April 2021

Covid -19
The Scottish Avalanche Information Service issues information to support permitted activity under current Scottish Government guidance.
Please be aware of current mandatory travel restrictions in Local Authority areas within Scotland and respect local communities by referring to Scottish Government guidance and safe route choices for exercise. For further guidance please refer to the following information for hillwalkers and climbers and snowsports on ski and board.
This blog is intended to provide hazard and mountain condition information to help plan safer mountain trips.
Today was bitterly cold with snow showers throughout the day. Winds were very strong North Westerly. Fresh snow was drifting in the strong winds causing localised windslab accumulations to develop in steep wind sheltered locations, gully tops and coire rims are most affected. Existing instabilities will persist and further instabilities will develop as snow showers continue with very cold temperatures. East through South to South-West aspects above 950 metres will be most affected. Elsewhere the snowpack will remain firm and stable.

Looking into Coire an t-Sneachda. The cliffs remained out of view most of the day. Most of the slopes in the picture have been scoured by the strong North-Westerly winds, however fresh windslab was developing in shallow gullies, hollows and behind boulders at this height. This is an indication of greater accumulations in high wind sheltered locations as detailed in the forecast.

Where windslab accumulations were forming they were unstable as shown by this crack from my boot.

Snow build up on the sheltered side of rocks. An indication that although fresh snow amounts may seem limited accumulations are building in wind sheltered areas.

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